lady painting

 

Sep 2003 Journal

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Jewish immigration featured on national website

'Moving Here', a new website recording and illustrating the history of immigrant groups settling in Britain in the last 200 years, gives prominence to the Jewish community which was established prior to and during the twentieth century. Sponsored by the National Archive, and the result of two years' research, the website also features the Caribbean, Irish and South Asian immigrant communities.

Drawing on the resources of 30 museums, libraries and archives, the new website offers 150,000 documents, illustrations and historic photographs of all kinds, making it one of the largest projects of its type ever undertaken. 'Moving Here', which can be found on www.movinghere.org.uk, is a free website which enables visitors to see first-hand records of the experiences of people who left their homelands and made a new life in Britain. It also allows migrants to add their own stories to the archive.

Among the documents available for inspection are registers of the Jewish Free School dating back to the nineteenth century, Home Office records of the names and details of Jewish refugees granted asylum during World War II and photographs of the few clothes and mementos brought by a Kindertransport child. Listed as a Hampstead psychoanalyst, Anna Freud was officially designated a female enemy alien, but granted exemption from internment. British Jewry's Book of Honour lists the names of all Jewish servicemen who served in the British Army in World War I.

AJR's partner in last year's record-breaking Continental Britons exhibition, the Jewish Museum, is a major contributor to the 'Moving Here' project and provided no fewer than 16,000 images of Jewish migration to, and settlement in, Britain. The website offers a unique resource for those interested in Britain's diverse heritage and an accessible resource for Jewish people keen to explore their roots and cultural origins.
Ronald Channing

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