in the garden

 

Sep 2002 Journal

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Central Office for Holocaust Claims

Payouts reach 100,000 survivors

The number of people who have received their first payment from the German Slave and Forced Labour Compensation Programme has reached 100,000, according to figures released by the Jewish Claims Conference (JCC). The JCC has also pledged to complete the first round of payments by the end of this year. Eligible applicants will also receive a cheque for $1,000 (approximately £600) from the Swiss Banks settlement as well as a further payment of around £1,500 from the German Fund at the beginning of next year.

Praise for Dutch Fund

More than 450 UK applicants to the Dutch Maror Fund have received payments totalling £18 million. The Fund, which has been praised for the speed and efficiency of its work, has confirmed that the worldwide total number of eligible victims is likely to be 35,000.

German ghetto law correction

Further to the note published in last month's journal, the new address for correspondence of the Landesversicherungsanstalt Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg is Postfach 701125, 22011 Hamburg, Germany.

French investigative commission

The deadline for filing claims in respect of bank accounts and other financial assets despoiled by the Vichy regime and its German occupier during the Second World War has been extended to 18 January 2003.

To make an application or receive further information about the work of the Commission, write to Le Rapporteur Général, Commission Indemnisation de Victimes de Spoliation (CIVS), 1 Rue de la Manutention, 75116 Paris, France, tel 0033 1 56 52 85 00.

Further help

Written enquiries should be sent to Central Office for Holocaust Claims (UK), 1 Hampstead Gate, 1a Frognal, London NW3 6AL. For assistance with the completion of application forms, please telephone 020 7431 6161 for an appointment.
Michael Newman

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