Jul 2006 Journal

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Central Office for Holocaust Claims

German life certificate notarisation

As announced in last month's Journal, the AJR is now recognised as an 'official British office' and will be able to notarise for AJR members life certificates issued by the German pension authority, the Deutsche Rentenversicherung Bund (DRB).

In order to avoid complications and delays with payments, members wishing to have their life certificates notarised by the AJR must present themselves together with their passport (or some widely accepted form of identification) at AJR Head Office, our Day Centre in Cleve Road or at a regional group meeting. Home visits can also be arranged by contacting Head Office.

Members can continue to visit the German embassy to have their forms legalised, as well as at police stations, financial institutions, physicians, rabbinates and notaries public.

Hungarian compensation: a reminder

The deadline to apply for the recently extended Hungarian compensation programme is 31 July 2006. The scheme, sponsored by the Hungarian government, makes lump sum awards of $1,800 (HUF 400,000) to the living spouse, child or parent of a Holocaust victim who died due to the 'political despotism of the Hungarian authority or an official person, or if the injured person died during deportation or forced labour'.

In cases where there are no such living relatives a living sibling is entitled to half the compensation amount.

Application forms are available from this office and should be returned, once completed, to: The Central Compensation Office, 1116 Budapest, Hauszmann Alajos utca 1. The telephone number is 0036 1 371 8900, fax is 0036 1 371 89 12, and email information@karpotlas.hu

Written enquiries should be sent to Central Office for Holocaust Claims (UK), Jubilee House, Merrion Avenue, Stanmore, Middx HA7 4RL, by fax to 020 8385 3075, or by email to mnewman@ajr.org.uk
Michael Newman

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