Feb 2004 Journal

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Central Office for Holocaust Claims

Austrian Assistance Fund

Improvements to the Austrian Holocaust Survivor Emergency Assistance Programme (AHSEAP) will enable more former Austrian refugees to benefit from a wide range of essential social and care services.

As well as a liberalisation of the financial criteria - allowing some survivors with higher savings to apply - it is hoped that the new guidelines, including a more comprehensive list of the types of assistance available, will both entitle those previously restricted from receiving funds and attract new applicants.

Those eligible to receive awards from the fund include Austrian Nazi victims who have both a medical condition requiring urgent attention and those who have modest savings and a reduced income.

Awards from the fund are capped, with eligible applicants receiving up to £4,500 a year for medical needs, including financing the cost of wheelchairs, the installation of appliances for the housebound disabled, and grants to cover the cost of dental care and hearing aids.

Also entitled to receive awards are victims with limited means who require funds to buy into the Austrian Social Security Pension scheme and grants to cover emergency housing matters, including assistance to prevent eviction and funds to avoid utility disconnection.

In the light of the changes to the programme, those previously ineligible to receive funds may now be entitled. For further information, please contact the Association of Jewish Refugees Social Services Department on 020 8385 3070.

Further help

Written enquiries should be sent to Central Office for Holocaust Claims (UK), Jubilee House, Merrion Avenue, Stanmore, Middx HA7 4RL, by fax to 020 8385 3075, or by email to michael@ajr.org.uk. Assistance can be provided strictly by appointment at the Holocaust Survivors Centre in Hendon, north London. For an appointment, please ring 020 8385 3074.
Michael Newman

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